Tag Archives: Blue Dolphin Tour

The People Of Zanzibar

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If ever there was a truly tolerant and hard-working people, it would that of this pearl of beauty in the Indian Ocean. It lies approximately twenty miles off the coast of East Africa and fifty from Dar Es Salaam.  They work as hard as can be and the best way of thanking these people for providing me with such a rich, unforgettable and life-changing experience is to write this post and spread their wisdom, though, in truth, it should be kept a secret.

Coming up to two years ago in July of 2013, I embarked on a voluntary placement with African Impact; a project called the Zanzibar Rural Teaching and Community Project. The local people and other volunteers are some of the most extraordinary people I’ve ever met. Take Dulla, one of the project managers.

Seaweed

Seaweed (Photo credit: Horatiu Curutiu)

He would arise at three a.m. to tend to his mother’s seaweed plantation. This was the main cash crop in Zanzibar when I was there. That was at least two hours work. Then he would return home to cook breakfast at five. Another hour. Time to get his son up.

It’s at least twenty minutes walk either way. Next is lesson planning. Afterwards, it’s now eight-thirty. Hop on the bike now and its up to the Jambiani Tourism Training Institute.

Arrive at nine. Teach the class. Good. Ten-fifteen now. Over to the primary school for ten-thirty. Teach at the primary school, actually there were three, till twelve. Go home. Eat lunch. One o’clock now and lesson planning for the football boys’ lessons in English.  Three o’clock.

The kids are home. Head out to set up and undertake football practice. That means it is now four o’clock. After that, you have to teach them English until 18:00.

Then, and only then, does he go home and help his wife to cook and the kids with homework. What a day!! If anyone was forced to do that in rich parts of the world, people would tell them to get help. The seaweed workers could be seen when we woke up and gazed onto the beach at 6 a.m.in the morning, the the eastern sky the colour of a blood orange.

Lets take the inhabitants of Stone Town. Extremely resourceful in making money. They do it any way they can think of. Some will try to sell nice souvenirs such as very fine arts and crafts, music CDs and Zanzibar football shirts. Others will helpfully give you directions. But perhaps the most interesting and educational of these entrepreneur are the tour guides.

English: A food seller displaying his items at...

English: A food seller displaying his items at Forodhani park in Zanzibar (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

However, once we were given a tour without being asked and were expected to pay afterwards. Its always wise to carry a bit more money than usual around the town. Just in case. Now, you won’t see many beggars, during the day. They only come out of the woodwork at the night market. They are completely harmless and won’t usually ask for more than a thousand shillings, or forty British pence.

Considerate? They are very much so. There is a Red Colobus monkey reserve in the middle of the island and, when we drove through this area, the drivers always slowed down and I never saw one of the creatures lying dead by the roadside. They are an endangered species and this area, plus the rest of the island, is their only known habitat.

Red Colobus monkey in Jozani forest. Endemic t...

Red Colobus monkey in Jozani forest. Endemic to Zanzibar. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Want to have some fun and games? Why not see Makunduchi festival. The occurrence of this party is at the end of every month.

The idea behind it is simple. At the end of every month, all the men-of-age in the community gather into groups and are issued banana sticks. Then they gather in a large field with the women cheering on their partner.

It is up to the mayor to then to basically say “Alright, chaps. Any bad blood between you, take it out in three-two-one…NOW!”, at which point he blows the whistle and the men start whacking one another. One shouldn’t be alarmed,though.

The sticks hurt a little, but not for long. Its no worse than a bee sting.  The fight will spread all over the field and you should be prepared to leg it, quickly, lol:)

The point about these people is not the cliche that they have less and are happier for it.  Nor is it the fact that they work hard or that they have a permanent smile upon their face. It is the combination of all three.

Their strength is that, despite the fact that they desire better healthcare and education, they know enough not to complain.

“Gallantry and wisdom without knowing it”. That is the way I would describe the inhabitants of the archipelago. Their plight is not that of other countries in the area. They have thriving tourism and crop industries.

It is that most common of foes, environmental destruction and, on the part of foreign tourists, carelessness. The main perpetrator of these crimes are the large, global hotel chains that set up shop on the island.

The swimming pool at Baraza Resort and Spa pip...

The swimming pool at Baraza Resort and Spa pipes music into the water so you can hear it while you are swimming. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There was once a time when, on one of our week-end activities, we decided to attend a full-moon party in a place called Nungwi at the northernmost tip of Unguja, the main island of Zanzibar.

We came into the village in our minivan and I observed, in front of us, two children playing on either side of a brown puddle that straddled the road. I said “Look at those two kids playing in the mud”. It wasn’t mud.

Cute Young African Boy

Cute Young African Boy (Photo credit: terbeck)

The full-moon festival was great! Not for Manoel, a Swiss volunteer, though. He took one bite into his burger on the first evening and prudently chose not to eat the rest. However, that did not stop him from being violently sick.

It was also the weekend where I met Jennifer, my girlfriend of the time. She was a lovely person. She was from the mainland where her dad worked, or possibly still does, on the Serengeti as a park warden.

These people have resilience and humanity at every turn. They are quite happy on their little island. What a marvellous adventure!

Zanzibar

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Ah, this Island must be one of the best places on Earth! You can see sandy, unspoiled beaches where the seaweed workers toil, a bright sky, friendly, smiling locals abound! The reasons why people come are many and varied, but one thing is for sure…they’ll never forget it.

Take Stone Town, on the west coast and also the capital, for example. One may come by sea and be dropped of right in the centre of the capital of the Island.

Stone Town Alleyway

Stone Town Alleyway (Photo credit: fabulousfabs)

Here you’ll  find Forodhani Gardens, an open area that, during the evening time, comes alive with the hustle and bustle of the Night Market. This is one of the most interesting exhibits of Zanzibar.

You can try falafel from the Middle East, spicy potato, a local dish, and chapattis all in the same meal.

Oh, and don’t forget to try some sugar cane juice! Across the road from the gardens lies the old Sultans palace, now the Museum of Zanzibar. You’ll have an enlightening experience here. See it below.

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If you head inland you surely will come to the shopping district that is a labyrinth of small shops all lined up where you can buy clothes locally woven with beautiful African colours that are vibrant in the extreme, and lots of hand-made pots plus other souvenirs generally made from Malachite.

Be sure to ask if something is Ivory, which is illegal. If it is Ivory, don’t buy it. You can help to stop elephant poaching that way. A tour of Stone Town is easy…there are guides all over and will be willing to tell you all about the city and its past…including the Arab Sultans and the slave trade.

Ivory has always been a highly valuable materi...

Ivory has always been a highly valuable material for carving. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

You can also enter the slave chambers and experience them for yourself, although this is not for the faint-hearted.

Now, heading east, you will find out why it is called the Spice Island.

Stone Town’s Spice Market is full of the smells of paradise; mint leaves and vanilla spice may be bought here for less than a pound.

Another advantage of Zanzibar: cheap, almost free living.

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Dalla Dalla‘s! These jaunty vehicles are the best way to travel around the island. With their lack of suspension, wooden crate-like structures for cabins that always find room for more people…

even if it means crouching down, not strapped down, in the seating area with fifty other people, a dead shark that stinks on top, tarpaulin mats over the side and sweaty bodies…you will find them charming.

Don’t forget that the drivers know the word “accelerator” from 150-yards away but don’t know “brake” even if you’re in the front cab and screaming it at them.

And that the roads are filled with potholes.I remind you of the lack of suspension in these vehicles. Does this sound like fun? If you wish to find the beaches of the Island, the east and north coasts are the best for this.

Azure skies, beaches almost bleached white by the sun, crystal clear water and bars where juices and ales may be bought for sixty-pence await you here.

You can spend many a day and night carefree, swimming at 6:00 am when the water is still warmer than the air.

These beaches, when full-moon parties are in swing, come alive with tourists and locals, vibrant with the lifeblood of their island…happiness and joy.

These parties usually include liberal amounts of alcohol, despite the island being 95% Muslim.

One should not travel alone to these parties, safety in numbers always. Remember, when travelling by taxi, to negotiate the fare before setting out.

The main tourist extra-curricular activities in Zanzibar include the must-do Dolphin Tour where you will head out beyond the Island’s coral reef about a mile or so…and do the unthinkable…swim with Dolphins in the open Indian Ocean!

Dolphins

Dolphins (Photo credit: ryn413)

The Spice Tour is an exhibition of Jozani forest; an area in the middle of the Island, equidistant between Stone Town in the west and the east coast.

This is where the mangrove swamp is located and you may hire a guide here for a very low price.This area is also famous for its endangered but very cute Red Colobus Monkeys.

The Dalla Dalla and taxi drivers always use those otherwise-underused brakes here. There are many other tours that can be undertaken, it’s magnificent!

Red Colobus Monkey

Red Colobus Monkey (Photo credit: Adrian Maidment)

As for travelling to the island, Emirates Airlines have scheduled services from London to Nairobi or Dar Es Salaam, on the Tanzanian mainland, via Dubai where a very refreshing air-cooled terminal awaits. From either of these two cities, you may fly or, in the latter’s case, sail to Stone Town.

My personal trip set me back about £760. A more expensive option would be to fly direct to Nairobi and then on…you can expect to pay around 850 UK pounds in that scenario.

Flying from London is about a six-hour journey to Dubai, another four and a half to Nairobi and an hour and forty minutes to Zanzibar.

If you choose the Dar Es Salaam route then you should expect to pay about fifty pounds for the flight or ferry to the island.

Now thats about all but just remember to stay safe and allow the Spice Island to enchant you!